Gilly Flower Seeds Packet

$2.35

SKU: SEVIOL
Barcode: 843458152460


  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Species: Matthiola
  • Genus: Incana
  • Plant Height/Width: Varies but flower stem can be 24"-28"
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Difficulty: Easy

Step One: Timing

When to start?

  • plant outside after danger of frost in spring.

Step Two: Starting

Where to start and how to sow?

  • Transplant (recommended) - Sow ¼" deep into 128-cell plug flats 5-6 weeks before transplanting out into the field or protected structure.
  • Direct seed: after danger of frost. Do not pinch plants. Succession-plant every two weeks for multiple harvests. Stock is a cool-weather crop. Spring and fall-blooming successions are optimal.

Stock is a member of the brassica plant family and is susceptible to flea beetle predation. To prevent flea beetle damage, cover plants with row cover at the time of transplanting.

Step Three: Growing

How to keep happy?

  • Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy
  • Prevent seed production that drains the plant's energy at the expense of forming new flowers

Gilly

Gillyflower, also known as Stock, possesses the ability to attract butterflies, pollinators, and bees. It is also super easy to grow and maintain; is edible, fast-growing, and fragrant. This traditional flower exhibits a broad spectrum of colors and a unique, spicy-sweet aroma. It's highly favored by growers for its quick maturation, even in cooler conditions, facilitating season extension and holiday sales. With harvestable crops achievable within 10–12 weeks under at least 13 hours of daylight, stock stands out as one of the earliest cut flowers, fitting well in container, cut flower, dried flower, fragrant, and landscaping gardens, and resistant to deer.

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Stake your plant

Support plants with stakes to prevent wind or blossom weight from causing them to topple.





Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Stake your plant

Support plants with stakes to prevent wind or blossom weight from causing them to topple.





The Brief and Glorious History of the Gilly

Originating from Europe and the Mediterranean, stock flowers gained popularity in Victorian England. Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing stock flowers to the United States around 1771, planting them at Monticello and igniting a floral trend, hence sometimes referred to as Virginia stock. During the Middle Ages, stock flowers held value as currency for land transactions in England. In Victorian times, they were believed to possess healing properties, used not only for decorative purposes but also to treat ailments like venomous bites and aid digestion.