Safflower Flower Seeds Packet

$2.35

SKU: SESAFF
Barcode: 843458152484

Great for dried flower bouquets and a beautiful pop of gold/orange/yellow in your garden.


  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Genus: Carthamus
  • Species: Tinctorius
  • Plant Height/Width: 18-24"
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Difficulty: Easy

Step One: Timing

When to start?

  • after last frost

Step Two: Starting

Where to start and how to sow?

  • Direct sow (recommended) - Sow after danger of frost. Cover seed lightly. Note: After germination, 65°F (18°C) is the ideal temperature for seedling development.
  • Start indoors: Sow into 50-cell plug tray, or preferred seedling container, 4-5 weeks before planting out. Harden off and transplant out after danger of frost.

Step Three: Growing

How to keep happy?

  • Average well-drained soil.
    Safflower requires especially deep soil, developing a taproot that can extend 10' down into the earth.

Safflower

Versatile and visually striking, this plant boasts tufted thistle-like flowers atop sturdy stems. Its fiery orange-and-gold petals not only captivate the eye but also tantalize the palate, serving as a delectable addition to culinary creations. It is often used as a saffron substitute. Known by the evocative name Zanzibar, it brings a touch of exotic allure to any garden.

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Alternate usage

You can use this as a saffron substitute! But take care harvesting. The plants are a little prickly.

Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Alternate usage

You can use this as a saffron substitute! But take care harvesting. The plants are a little prickly.

The Brief and Glorious History of the Safflower

Renowned for its versatility, this plant serves as a remarkable saffron alternative, earning it the moniker "poor man's saffron". Beyond its culinary prowess, its Dark Orange-Red hue makes it a stunning ornamental addition, cleverly doubling as a discreet garden barrier. With stiff, almost prickly foliage, it has long stood as a natural fencing solution, warding off unwanted garden intruders for centuries.