Purple Peas Flower Seeds Packet

$2.35

SKU: SEPEAS
Barcode: 843458152880

Magical deep purple pods Highly versatile for cooking but also highly ornamental… and quick and easy to grow!


  • Genus: Pisium
  • Species: Sativium
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Difficulty: Easy

Step One: Timing

When to start?

  • plant your Pea Seeds outside 4-6 weeks before the average last frost for your area
  • Make sure that the soil is warmer than 45 degrees. Choose an open, weed-free site in full sun.

Step Two: Starting

Where to start and how to sow?

  • Peas prefer cool, damp weather but avoid working in overly wet soil as this will compact and your peas may rot. Try to dig plenty of well-rotted compost into the soil several weeks before sowing to improve soil fertility and help retain moisture. Plant your pea seeds about 1 inch deep in full sun. Allow 6 inches between each pea seed. Keep an eye on your seeds for a few days - if they wash out of the soil, poke them back in with a pen, twig, etc. 18-24" between plants once they sprout and about 12" between rows if doing multiple rows

Step Three: Growing

How to keep happy?

  • Grow your peas in moist, fertile, well-drained soil. They will need little to no fertilizer.

Purple Peas

This is a shelling pea. This highly regarded, colorful and versatile variety produces deep purple flowers and can be eaten raw as a pea pod or harvested as peas for cooking.

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Harvest

Grab the vine with one hand and pick the peas off with the other hand to avoid damaging the vines. Harvest when the peas are tender and the pods are developed.

Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Harvest

Grab the vine with one hand and pick the peas off with the other hand to avoid damaging the vines. Harvest when the peas are tender and the pods are developed.

The Brief and Glorious History of the Purple Peas

Pea plants, adorned with purple blossoms, are not merely ornamental; they catalyzed a significant advance in biology. Gregor Mendel, an Austrian monk, studied common garden pea plants in the mid-1800s, laying the foundation for genetics. In contrast, King Tut's burial reveals regal opulence overshadowed by physical afflictions and familial complexities. Legends of curses aside, King Tut allegedly bequeathed the purple pea, a purported relic sprouting from his tomb. Though likely apocryphal, the allure of this botanical relic persists, emblematic of the intersection of science and myth.