Oxallis Flower Seeds Packet

$2.35

SKU: SEOXAL
Barcode: 843458152583

For stunning foliage and charming pink flowers, this plant is a perfect choice! It thrives as a houseplant and in containers, requiring minimal upkeep.


  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Genus: Oxalis
  • Species: Corymbosa
  • Plant Height/Width: 6-12"
  • Season: Blooms often but the plant might go dormant in hot months. But don't worry! It will come back!
  • Exposure: Shade to partial sun

Step One: Timing

When to start?

  • plant in early spring after last frost.

Step Two: Starting

Where to start and how to sow?

  • The seeds of most oxalis plants germinate quickly, usually in 7–14 days. In early spring, prepare a bed or container with well-draining soil and space the seeds about an inch apart. Cover them with a thin 1/8 to 1/4 inch of soil and water them.

Step Three: Growing

How to keep happy?

  • In well-composted soil, oxalis seldom needs extra food. For container-grown ones, apply slow-release fertilizer at planting.
  • Avoid fertilizing during midsummer dormancy.

Oxalis

Oxalis corymbosa, also known as the gold veined shamrock, is a stunning plant with its 3-lobed leaves adorned with gold veins, forming an enchanting mound. Its delightful pink blooms stand tall above the foliage. Although it may go dormant in hot summers, don't discard it; it will return when the weather cools. While oxalis species boast beautiful blossoms, they are primarily grown for their foliage. The small, intricate five-petal blossoms often begin as tubular flowers, unfurling to reveal delicate stripes and dark-colored throats. It's important to note that many oxalis plants are toxic to humans and animals, so keep them away from areas frequented by children and pets.

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Take a little off the top

Regularly trim yellowing or dead leaves to keep the plant looking tidy. Pinch leggy stems for fuller growth.

Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Take a little off the top

Regularly trim yellowing or dead leaves to keep the plant looking tidy. Pinch leggy stems for fuller growth.

The Brief and Glorious History of the Oxallis

Oxalis exhibits trifoliate leaves resembling those of clover, heightening its allure. This unique characteristic distinguishes the Oxalis genus, leading to its designation as "false shamrocks." Throughout history, different societies have utilized select Oxalis species for medicinal purposes, addressing maladies like digestive ailments, skin conditions, and even scurvy, owing to their vitamin C richness.