Evening Primrose Flower Seeds Packet

$2.35

SKU: SEPRIM
Barcode: 843458152552

Evening Primrose, a cherished native of North America, boasts abundant pale yellow blooms, illuminating fields with its summer evening splendor.


  • Plant Type: Biennial
  • Genus: Oenothera
  • Species: Biennis
  • Plant Height/Width: up to 48"
  • Season: Fall and Spring
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Difficulty: Easy

Step One: Timing

When to start?

  • plant these seeds in the Fall
  • starting in Fall gives them a chance to grow up quickly the next year
  • can start them in early Spring too

Step Two: Starting

Where to start and how to sow?

  • Direct sow: outside before March 1st. Seed depth 1/16 inch.
  • Start inside: late summer or fall so they are naturally exposed to the cold and will germinate the following spring/summer. Plant spacing 4-6".

Step Three: Growing

How to keep happy?

  • These will self seed and keep on growing year after year. Fertilizer is not necessary.

Evening Primerose

Known for attracting bees and pollinators, easy maintenance, and rapid growth, this fragrant flower suits containers, landscaping, and xeriscaping. Cold and drought-tolerant and deer and rabbit resistant. Native to North America, it's best sown in late fall, blooming each summer from its second year. Fragrant, lemon-scented yellow flowers bloom atop leafy stems.

Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Preserving Your Blooms

As flowers fade, consider seed-saving for future growth or let them embark on their own seed-scattering adventure!

Rating of 1 means .
Rating of 4 means .
The rating of this product for "" is 4.

Preserving Your Blooms

As flowers fade, consider seed-saving for future growth or let them embark on their own seed-scattering adventure!

The Brief and Glorious History of the Evening Primrose

Shakespeare fancied evening primrose, slipping it into his plays, while Suzanne Collins gave Katniss's sis a flowery name in "The Hunger Games". "Primrose" means "first rose", yet it's no rose at all! Both Europeans and Native Americans banked on its medicinal charm, from healing wounds to tackling the pesky hemorrhoids!